17 PERSONS TO BENEFIT FROM CARIBBEAN VOCATIONAL QUALIFICATION TRAINING

A total of 17 persons are enrolled in the Caribbean Vocational Qualification (CVQ) training at the Airport Inn Hotel, Providenciales. Participants were invited from the public high schools as well as the private sector and will be trained as assessors and verifiers during the exercise that will extend from 24th August to 11 September 2015.

"The National Training Agency from Trinidad and Tobago will be responsible for the training”, said Cherylann Jones, Permanent Secretary, Ministry of Education Youth Sports and Library Services. "The proposed introduction of the CVQ forms part of the Ministry’s goals to strengthen technical and vocational education and skills training in the Turks and Caicos Islands.

"The areas slated for introduction in this academic year 2015/2016 include food preparation, construction, data operations, customer services, and early childhood education. This implementation of the CVQs’ will be done on a phased basis, and as such, additional areas will be introduced in line with the demand of the labour market and available resources.

"As part of the proposed introduction of the CVQ, a team from CXC will be in country during the week of August 31 through September 4 to undertake a pre-audit of the public schools’ facilities and to make recommendations geared at ensuring that the facilities meet the required CVQ standards."

The Ministry of Education would like to take this opportunity to thank all those persons who have invested their time and energy in this venture and is assuring the populace that the introduction of the CVQ signals significant growth and development as we seek to create a group of highly qualified local skilled workers.

SUPERVISOR OF ELECTIONS AIMS TO PROVIDE GREATER EDUCATION TO VOTERS

The Supervisor of Elections, Dudley Lewis has moved to provide an in depth experience in voter registration information. 

Voter Registration in the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI) is a continuous process and current eligible voters or TCI Islanders who will become of voting age (18 years) before the production of the next Electors Register have the opportunity to register. 

“The Register of Electors is generally up-dated on a regular basis to include those who have achieved voting age, who have gained TCI Status, who otherwise have become newly eligible (e.g. been released from prison) or who move from one electoral district to another,” stated Mr. Lewis. 

“The Register is also required to exclude formally eligible voters who have died or ceased to meet residential requirements or voter eligibility or persons serving a term of imprisonment for twelve months (12) or more or who has been certified to be insane or who has otherwise been judged to be of unsound mind.” 

“The Electors List is produced and published 31st January in every year and the Register of Electors produced and published 31st March in each year.” 

The qualifying date for persons to register as electors is November 30th in each year. 

General Elections in the Turks and Caicos Islands is scheduled for 2016 and persons who want to exercise their democratic right to vote in this up-coming general election MUST apply to regulate their status with the Ministry of Border Control and register with the elections department by November 30, 2015 to have their names added to the 2016/17 Electors Register that will be used to conduct general elections. 

Eligible voters on the present Register of Electors do not need to re-apply to be included in the 2016/17 Register.  They will be automatically included unless they notify the elections office that they have change their name or place of residence, or no longer meet the eligibility criteria.   

Persons who do not register before the qualifying date November 30th 2015 will NOT be permitted to vote in the 2016 General Elections. 

ENDS  

 

BE SMART, DO YOUR PART REGISTER TO VOTE 

WHY SHOULD YOU REGISTER TO VOTE 

Your vote is your voice and for your voice to be heard, you must register to vote, it is your right and responsibility.

Elected officials determine much concerning the quality of life so don’t let someone else choose your elected official for you.

The biggest election issues often directly effects the Youth and will impact life for years to come and the only way democracy works is if Citizens, young and old, are active participants in the electoral process. 

If you haven’t already, here are a few more reasons why you should register to secure your right to vote:

  • Voting gives you a say on important issues that effects everything from roads, health care and education. 
  • If you don’t register you cannot Vote, it is as simple as that.   
  • To vote in 2016 general elections your name must be on the electors register. 
  • Elections give you a chance to choose your leadership and ruling political party.  It gives you a say on who represents you in your electoral district and “All Island” district and the House of Assembly. 

One (1) Candidate will be selected to represent you in Electoral District and five (5) in “All Island” Districts whether you vote or not, so if you are registered, you will have the chance to have a say on who represents you.  

Persons are quick to complain when they disagree with Politicians, but if you don’t register and vote nothing will change.  Make sure you do your part for elections 2016.

You may think voting changes nothing but in fact it is one of the most important means of making a difference.  Remember a Government only has power because people vote for it.  If you don’t register to vote you’re giving control over your life to those who actually go out and vote.

General Elections can be called at any time and at a short notice.  If you’re not registered you won’t be able to vote, so don’t wait until it’s too late register today and you can have your say.

REGISTRATION PROCEDURES

The TCI Elections Department publishes two voter’s lists each year, the Preliminary Electors List and the Electors Register.  Registration takes place on a continuous basis and persons desirous of being added to the register can simply: 

  • Visit the Ministry of Border Control and Labor Office in Grand Turk or Providenciales and apply for TCI status.  
  • If status is verified and approved a status card will be issued. 
  • The person must also visit the elections department, complete the required voter registration application form and if residential and other requirements are met their names will be approved and added to the elector’s list and register. 
  • Persons will not be registered until their status as is first verified and approved by the Ministry of Border Control.   

The procedure for voter registration must be followed to avoid names not being added to the register. 

Persons who possess the following qualifications is entitled to register:

  • Has TCI status and has attained the age of eighteen (18) years. 
  • Is resident in the Islands and has been so resident for not less than twelve (12) months, in the aggregate, out of two (2) years immediately preceding the qualifying date or 
  • He or she is a member of Her Majesty’s Forces 
  • A person working abroad on government business 
  • A student residing abroad 

A person is regarded as working abroad on Government business if he/she is employed by or engaged pursuant to a contract with the Government to carry out duties in a place outside the Islands.

A person is a student residing abroad if he/she is engaged in a course of study which requires him/her to attend for not less than 10 hours per week at an educational establishment outside the Islands and: 

(a)        If the attendance at the course is wholly or mainly paid out of public funds, he/she must produces a letter from the Permanent Secretary responsible for education that the course is approved by Government. 

(b)        In any other case he/she must produce a letter from a senior official at the educational establishment confirming that he/she is a bona fide student at the establishment. 

Application for registration must be completed and signed by the applicant and forward to the Supervisor to establish qualification to be registered.

Application forms for the inclusion on the Electors Register may be collected from the Elections Offices in Grand Turk and Providenciales or the District Commissioner’s Office in Salt Cay, South Caicos, Middle Caicos (Conch Bar) and North Caicos (Bottle Creek).

For further information on electoral registration process, please contact the election office Grand Turk Telephone 946-2558 or 946-338-2302 email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. 

For information on the verification of TCI citizen status and issuing of TCI status card, contact Ministry of Border Control and Labor.

  

Lister Dudley Lewis, CPM

Supervisor of Elections

Immigration (Amendment) Bill 2015

The House of Assembly yesterday passed the Immigration (Amendment) Bill 2015.  This important piece of legislation has three main features as follows:

  1. It amends the definition of “gainful occupation” to exclude from the definition (but only for the purposes of applying for a business license) persons who have invested in a business and who do not intend to work in that business and passive investors who are non-executive directors of the business and who are not involved in the day to day operation of that business.  The previous law required all such investors to possess a work permit in order for the business to be granted a business license.  This amendment revised this provision. However, if the investor intends to be involved in the day to day operation of the business or intends to work in the business, he or she would still require a work permit.
  2. The Bill also amends section 13(1) and section 30 of the Immigration Ordinance by deleting the phrase “living together with the Belonger” to be replaced by “and the holder of a Residence Permit”.  The effect of this amendment at section 13(1) is that a spouse of an Islander who holds a Residence Permit is free to work in the Islands, thereby requiring spouses of Islanders to get a residency permit in order to work, as opposed to just relying on their living together with their Islander spouse for their working rights.  The practical effect of this amendment is that so long as a spouse of an Islander is in possession of a Residence Permit, he or she may work in the Islands, even if they are no longer living together.
  3. Persons who were married before the change of law on August 13, 2012, can benefit from the law as it was on that date, with the result of this amendment being that those persons will only be required to be married to and living with an Islander spouse for 5 years ending with the date of his or her application for Islander status, whereas everyone who would have gotten married on or after August 13, 2012, would have to continue to wait the 10 years, as prescribed in the 2012 amendment.

For any further questions regarding the Immigration (Amendment) Bill 2015, please contact the Office of the Minister for Border Control and Employment.